Courses

Kairos courses are handpicked by our director to ensure you make the most out of your collegiate experience. The minimum number of Honors Credit hours required for the Honors Diploma is 24. Most of these hours are located in the general education core. Here are some classes currently in rotation:

Freshman Year Required Courses

HONR-LU101 & LU102 Freshman Seminar – 3 hrs


Kairos Gateway is an opportunity for the freshman cohort to examine the purpose of a liberal arts education and answer questions about what kinds of people it creates. It is the communal center of social life for our incoming freshmen. The Kairos sections of Benevolence and Global Perspectives further connect freshmen with each other and the university’s values.




HONR-EN110 Rhetoric & Research – 3 hrs


Kairos Rhetoric & Research is a mandatory class for all of our incoming freshmen which exposes them to and prepares them for the elevated demands of college writing. This class provides an environment which is both critically heightened and also extremely supportive of each individual student’s growth. It equips our students to succeed in a college environment while also guiding students in what it means to read intelligently for pleasure.




HONR-HU201 Foundations of Western Culture – 3 hrs


Kairos Foundations of Western Culture presents students with a core collection of ancient texts which are formative for the western literary and philosophical tradition. From these texts and the cultural history provided in the class, students can begin to trace the history of influential ideas from Homer into the present day. The class guides students as they learn how to synthesize textual evidence to form arguments. Students then construct arguments in class, in papers, and on exams, which habituates students to think critically about texts and arguments.




HONR-BS112 Environmental Science – 4 hrs


In Kairos Environmental Science, students discover how ecosystems develop and sustain themselves. In the lab portion of the class, students go on adventures with their professor to apply what they have learned to the local environment. It teaches our students to develop a growing sense of their connectedness to creation in both scientific and personal ways while also encouraging students to apply learning in situations outside of a physical classroom.





Sophomore Year Required Courses

HONR-TH230 Introduction to Theology – 3 hrs


In Kairos Introduction to Theology, students are presented with texts and doctrines that are core to Christian faith and tradition. It challenges them to ask questions about the development of Christianity while also providing resources where students can look for potential answers to these questions. In this class, students pursue critical and Christian exploration which allows them to better understand and appreciate the intellectual aspects of their faith.




HONR-TH231 Introduction to Christian Ethics – 3 hrs


Kairos Introduction to Christian Ethics builds on the theological knowledge students gain in Introduction to Theology and challenges them to apply their knowledge of theology to different ethical frameworks and questions about Christian ethics. In this class, our students learn to process difficult questions concerning how to apply a cohesive, Christian perspective to questions about right and wrong.





Courses Offered Every Year

HONR-HU202 Rise of Europe – 3 hrs


Kairos Rise of Europe bridges the gap between the ancient and modern worlds, illuminating their continuities and differences. Beginning with the fall of Rome, this class traces the history and development of Europe through the Renaissance by examining the literary, philosophical, religious, and artistic facets of Western culture during this time period. This class enhances students’ ability to trace the development of Western culture into the beginnings of modern Europe, thereby furthering their understanding of this culture.




HONR-PL250 American Government – 3 hrs


Kairos American Government goes beyond examining the function of the United States government and dives into a broader view of the philosophical and ideological foundation of democracies. The class helps students start to understand how a government works in relation to the people within it, teaching our students how to begin thinking about the strengths and weaknesses of American society and how to participate as a member of it.




HONR-PH241 Introduction to Philosophy – 3 hrs


In Kairos Introduction to Philosophy, students learn about philosophy from its origins into questions of modern relevance. By first discussing the questions philosophers have been asking since ancient Greece, the class provides students with a background from which to understand modern philosophical concerns. Then, turning to more modern philosophers, the class gives students an extended philosophical framework to explore questions about today’s world.





Courses Offered Every Other Year

HONR-LU101 & LU102 Freshman Seminar – 3 hrs


Kairos Gateway is an opportunity for the freshman cohort to examine the purpose of a liberal arts education and answer questions about what kinds of people it creates. It is the communal center of social life for our incoming freshmen. The Kairos sections of Benevolence and Global Perspectives further connect freshmen with each other and the university’s values.




HONR-EN110 Rhetoric & Research – 3 hrs


Kairos Rhetoric & Research is a mandatory class for all of our incoming freshmen which exposes them to and prepares them for the elevated demands of college writing. This class provides an environment which is both critically heightened and also extremely supportive of each individual student’s growth. It equips our students to succeed in a college environment while also guiding students in what it means to read intelligently for pleasure.




HONR-HU201 Foundations of Western Culture – 3 hrs


Kairos Foundations of Western Culture presents students with a core collection of ancient texts which are formative for the western literary and philosophical tradition. From these texts and the cultural history provided in the class, students can begin to trace the history of influential ideas from Homer into the present day. The class guides students as they learn how to synthesize textual evidence to form arguments. Students then construct arguments in class, in papers, and on exams, which habituates students to think critically about texts and arguments.




HONR-BS112 Environmental Science – 4 hrs


In Kairos Environmental Science, students discover how ecosystems develop and sustain themselves. In the lab portion of the class, students go on adventures with their professor to apply what they have learned to the local environment. It teaches our students to develop a growing sense of their connectedness to creation in both scientific and personal ways while also encouraging students to apply learning in situations outside of a physical classroom.





Colloquium

HONR-HU202 Rise of Europe – 3 hrs


Kairos Rise of Europe bridges the gap between the ancient and modern worlds, illuminating their continuities and differences. Beginning with the fall of Rome, this class traces the history and development of Europe through the Renaissance by examining the literary, philosophical, religious, and artistic facets of Western culture during this time period. This class enhances students’ ability to trace the development of Western culture into the beginnings of modern Europe, thereby furthering their understanding of this culture.




HONR-PL250 American Government – 3 hrs


Kairos American Government goes beyond examining the function of the United States government and dives into a broader view of the philosophical and ideological foundation of democracies. The class helps students start to understand how a government works in relation to the people within it, teaching our students how to begin thinking about the strengths and weaknesses of American society and how to participate as a member of it.




HONR-PH241 Introduction to Philosophy – 3 hrs


In Kairos Introduction to Philosophy, students learn about philosophy from its origins into questions of modern relevance. By first discussing the questions philosophers have been asking since ancient Greece, the class provides students with a background from which to understand modern philosophical concerns. Then, turning to more modern philosophers, the class gives students an extended philosophical framework to explore questions about today’s world.